9/15/09

Brit Word of the Day

Todays BWOTD is something many are lacking in right now:

"I could really do with a bit more moolah coming in"

'Moolah' = money

I have no idea where this originates from, so if you know please share, but I remember it from my youth. I do know though that it was used here in a popular advertising campaign, but with a totally different meaning.

12 comments:

Sunny said...

I remember my Dad saying that he had to go to work to make the moolah. He also used the word shekels for money.
I don't have any idea where it originated from.
Sunny :)

Anonymous said...

as far as I know moolah has the same meaning in the States. I've been saying moolah for money my whole life. Sorry,I don't know its origins either.

Pam said...

Yep, moolah is the same. Now dosh - that is one that will work for money that we have no idea what it is!!!

thelaughinghousewife said...

I'm not certain, but it may come from India; we ruled it for a while and we have a large ex-pat Indian community in the UK, and it's natural that words crossover. Think about how many American words and phrases are in common use here now, thanks to tv, etc. I heard a reporter on Sky News use the phrase, 'step up to the plate,' and we don't play baseball in this country! Language is all the richer for absorbing new words.

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

To me moolah is a little old fashioned word for money here.

Flea said...

I like the word moolah. Fred and Bessie LOVE the word Moolah. Would you like for them to visit you?

Pat said...

I remember my dad using that word for money back in the 1950s. He was in the Navy in the south Pacific during WW 2; perhaps it was military slang.

♥ Braja said...

The Aussie-isms all stem from British slang, of course, so these are like teething rings for me :))

Sherri said...

Now I have definitely heard of this one! Finally one!

Brit Gal Sarah said...

You know I think Laughing Housewife maybe right and it could have it's roots in our days of the Raj. It even sounds Indian!

Flea - yes I would be happy to host the illustrious Fred & Bessie.

Daryl said...

Moolah is a Brit word/term? Seriously? Nah. Been a Yank term forever

Jo, a retired teacher said...

We yanks must have brought the word over with us because I've heard it used all my life (and it's a fairly long one).